At Just the Right Time

I don’t know about you, but often I think God and I are on totally different schedules. When I want to go forward, He pulls me back. When I’m dragging my heels, He nudges me forward.

About four years ago, my husband and I found ourselves in a place of unemployment. Now that’s one of those times when you really want God to hurry. And as we watched our savings dwindle, we prayed and prayed for a miracle. Guess when it came? Yep, at the last minute. And as usually is the case, it was unexpected, and totally a God-thing.

We quickly put our house on the market. It sold in one week. Another God-thing. We loaded most of our things in three storage units, packed the rest in our van, and headed west. We found a small, five-hundred square foot rent-by-the-month apartment and crammed our stuff inside. This was a difficult and frightening time, but it was also a beautiful time. During those two months of living elbow to elbow, our family grew closer than ever. And we clung to God like never before.

I remember waking up every day saying, “Okay God, what now?” We had no idea how long we’d be staying, or where we’d go once my husband’s contract work was up. But we were trusting God to provide—at just the right time.

Meanwhile, we found a local church and jumped right in. I started teaching youth classes. I’m still amazed the educational minister let me, but I came with my “volunteer resume”, so I think that helped. And I think God knew I needed the connection, stability, and feeling of being needed, so He opened that door. And He had a bigger plan. A year later, after we moved to Missouri, I got a phone call. The church we had visited the summer before wanted to use a Vacation Bible School curriculum I had written (that’s another God-story entirely) and wanted me to come back as their key-note speaker.

Funny how God works. While we were in Texas wishing God would move faster, save us out of the mess we were in, give us that five year plan that’d let us know everything would be okay, He was busy working out a bigger plan. A better plan.

Our experience reminds me of the Israelites and all the ups and downs they’ve faced throughout history. For four hundred years, they slaved in Egypt waiting for their deliverer. Or think about David, the anointed king, who spent years hiding out in caves as the ruling king sought his life. What about Joseph? You remember him—the dreamer—the one who would one day rule over his brothers? The one who was thrown in a pit, sold into slavery, spent seven years in prison, to one day stand as the second in command to all of Egypt. What do you think he was thinking while he slept on the prison floor? How many nights did his heart cry out to God, asking, “Where are you? When will Your promise come?”

But each time God did come through, at just the right time.

For years the people of Israel waited for their Messiah. They had the promises—from Genesis chapter three all the way through Malachi. While evil kings rose to the throne, Isaiah spoke of an eternal just Ruler. When the Israelites were taken into Babylonian captivity they cried out for a Savior. I’m sure many felt as if God had abandoned them. That God couldn’t see them.

But God hadn’t forgotten, and He wasn’t off-duty. He was waiting for just the right time. Jesus came at just the right time.

Step back about 2000 years to the Roman world. Greek and Roman development helped make the first century AD the perfect time for Christ to come on the scene. The roads created by the Romans increased traffic and commerce, allowing the rapid-fire spread of Christianity to the ancient world. The Romans developed a sense of unity under their universal law that helped pave the way for the idea of monotheism. (A large proportion of ancients were polytheists.)

“The sense of solidarity within the empire created an environment favorable to the reception of a gospel that proclaimed the unity of the human race in the fact that all men are under the penalty of sin and in the fact that all are offered a salvation that makes them part of a universal organism–Christianity.” (Cairns, p. 35)

Non-Romans could become Roman citizens and people could move freely throughout the Roman Empire. Such travel would have been difficult prior to the reign of Augustus Caesar in 27-14 BC. As Rome conquered neighboring lands, natives began to question their polytheistic views. If their gods had abandoned them into the hands of another, then perhaps their gods were not as powerful as they thought.

And then came the Greeks and the expansion of ideas that they brought. They brought a universal language that later aided in the communication of the gospel. They also brought the  study of philosophy and a love for debate. Philosophers like Plato and Socrates encouraged people to look for an eternal Being. All of these things set the stage for Christianity.

And I could go on, but in a nutshell–Christ came at just the right time. At the fullness of time. When all the pieces of the puzzle were locked in place.

Just like Paul says in Galatians 4:4, “But when the time had fully come, God sent His Son, born of a woman, born under the law, to redeem those under the law, that we might receive the full rights of sons.”

And the Bible records this story–God’s love story–throughout its pages. A love story that will ultimately conclude in a great wedding feast. Are you coming?

Maybe you’re in Babylonian captivity right now, crying out for a Savior. Now is the  time of salvation. Maybe you’re enslaved by the problems of this world. God sees you. He loves you. And He’s coming. Even now He’s working out His plan. His good plan. His loving plan.

Hold tight.

1) Cairns, Earle E. Christianity Through the Centuries. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan; 1954.

Advertisements

One thought on “At Just the Right Time

  1. Pingback: Overcoming Rejection « V.V. Denman

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.