Picture of a Bible with quote from Oswald Chambers

The hungry and neglected heart will always find a way to justify sin. To deceive itself into believing that forbidden act is life-giving and that the ways of God lead to death. Death of joy, of freedom, of peace. Every compromising step gains strength, feeding the lies slowly strangling our souls, convincing us that God isn’t truly loving, faithful, and good. Until, years later, we look back at the rubble of our lives and wonder how we reached such devastation.

Relationships destroyed.

People hurt.

Hope dashed.

Jobs lost.

Personal integrity and our self-respect, shattered.

Our sense of purpose crushed between an overwhelming sense of futility.

Obedience is hard. Sometimes painful. But always life giving. And yet, this truth is hard to understand, to truly believe, if we don’t truly know God. Perhaps this is why A. W. Tozer wrote, “What comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us.”

The spouse who flirts with their coworker rather than investing in their marriage demonstrates they don’t believe God has their best in mind. That He’s either incapable of fulfilling Christ’s promises to bring us peace and joy, or that He simply doesn’t care enough to do so.

The friend who gives in to gossip believes the gratification and shallow connection she receives in the moment will fulfill her more than a life that honors Christ. That those immature friends, not God, will give her what her soul craves most.

We can often recognize, perhaps even predict, the destruction that comes from “big” and scandalous sins like adultery or theft, while excusing, even justifying the pride that slowly but steadily silences God’s voice and pull us further and further from Him.

Honestly, that’s the most destructive force within me, the virus that all too easily multiplies and evolves. It almost destroyed my marriage. It’s caused pain to my child. Because of it, I’ve had times when I’ve remained tethered to an “offense” that seeped toxins into my soul.

We’ve all probably witnessed this progression in others. We might even have felt repulsion rise up , but do we feel the same gut-level disgust to the sin lurking within us? Ready to devour us?

Darkness doesn’t play around, y’all. This is why Jesus used such strong, vivid analogies in Mark 9 when He said, “If your hand causes you to stumble, cut it off. It is better for you to enter life maimed than with two hands to go into hell, where the fire never goes out. And if your foot causes you to stumble, cut it off. It is better for you to enter life crippled than to have two feet and be thrown into hell. And if your eye causes you to stumble, pluck it out. It is better for you to enter the kingdom of God with one eye than to have two eyes and be thrown into hell” Mark 9:42-47, NIV).

Strong words. While not meant to be taken literally, they do accurately convey this truth: sin is much too enticing, deceptive, and destructive for us to tiptoe around it.

Woman walking in sand and quote on not tiptoeing around sin.

We were meant for more. For life. Vibrant, beyond-our-expectations, life. One so rich and full, Jesus was willing to give His all that we might receive it. May we honor that precious gift in how we live each day and with every thought and burgeoning desire we feed or starve.

Let’s talk about this! What are some ways you protect your heart before ugly seeds take root? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below, because we can all learn from and encourage each other. And make sure to connect with me on Facebook and Instagram.

Chronological Reading Plan Graphic Week 30

Catch the latest podcast episode, with guest Ava Pennington here:

Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64 Faith Over Fear

When we encounter painful and frightening circumstances, or God calls us to do something difficult, we may feel as if we’re all alone. As if God doesn’t see us, doesn’t understand our struggle, or won’t provide what we need. But as our guest Ava Pennington reminds us, our God doesn’t change. The same God called Jehovah-Jireh in Scripture, the God who provides, can be trusted to provide for us in our times of need as well. Find Ava Pennington at: https://www.AvaPennington.com https://www.facebook.com/AvaPennington.AuthorPage https://www.instagram.com/avapennington3/ Follow Jennifer: https://jenniferslatterylivesoutloud.com https://www.facebook.com/JenSlatte https://www.instagram.com/slatteryjennifer/ Find Wholly Loved, at: https://www.WhollyLoved.com Join the private Faith Over Fear Group Here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/442736966614671 Resources: Daily Reflections in the Names of God by Ava Pennington Group Discussion Questions: 1. When have you felt alone or unseen by God? 2. What contributed to those feelings? 3. What truths from today’s episode can help counter those feelings? 4. When you consider Christ’s death, for you, what comes to mind? 5. In what ways does the love Christ showed on the cross encourage you in your daily struggles? 6. What does it mean to you that God sees your need and provides in advance? 7. What do you think made it most challenging for Abraham to obey God when He told him to sacrifice his son? 8. What do you think gave Abraham the courage to obey? 9. When has God called you to do something hard or frightening? 10. What did you learn about Him during that situation or event? Episode Image Credit: Getty/rudall30
  1. Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64
  2. Finding Peace in the God of Heaven’s Armies (Jehovah-Sabaoth) – Ep. 63
  3. Trusting Adonai (Our Savior) to Be Our Lord – Ep. 62
  4. Confident of Salvation (el Shaddai) – Ep. 61
  5. Relying on the Great I Am (Yahweh) – Ep. 60

sunset over ocean with quote from Rick Warren.

When God calls me to something hard, or to make a drastic life-change, I want clear indications that I’m actually hearing from Him. I tell Him that, and I’m not being demanding nor does this come from a lack of faith. I trust His wisdom and guidance completely, but I don’t always trust my ability to hear and discern Him. And so, I ask for assurances, simultaneously deciding to obey however He leads while asking for the strength to do so. 

I don’t believe God faults me for this. He’s so gentle, so loving and attentive, and He gives me what I need. In those moments of uncertainty, He assures me of His grace and reminds me of His power and plans. Sitting in His presence, surrounded by and filled with Him, enveloped in His love, all my questions tend to fade. Inspired by His mission and the honor of being used by Him, I find I don’t need to know every step. I only need to know He’s with me and that He’s got everything all figured out. 

This is often how He prepares me–for the good, the bad, the difficult and painful, that lies ahead–not by reminding me of all I can or will or might do, but rather, of who He is. All-powerful, all-loving, all-knowing sovereign Lord. 

That may have been, at least in part, why He revealed Himself in such a powerful way to His disciples in Matthew 17. Six days prior, He had shared some really hard and confusing news: He would be rejected by the religious elite and would ultimately be killed, but then, after three days, He’d rise from the dead. (Luke 9:22) And then, He basically told them that if they wanted to follow Him, they needed to be willing to suffer as well. (Luke 23).

Consider, this occurred during what appeared to be the height of Jesus’ ministry. Large crowds were following Him and He was gaining influence. And now, He was telling His disciples that He was going to die? That didn’t make sense! And it certainly wasn’t what they expected. They’d left everything–their jobs, their way of life, and any dreams they might have entertained prior–to follow Christ, likely envisioning something similar to the first century equivalent of Billy Graham revivals. Not suffering, rejection, and tombs.

Can you imagine what must’ve gone through their minds? The questions, confusion, and likely, inner turmoil. I don’t know if they began to doubt Jesus, that He truly was the long-promised Messiah, but I think I might have. I might even have felt a bit cheated. We can respond like that, can’t we? When ministry endeavors don’t go as we expect or whatever God has called us to feels more challenging and less glamorous or overtly fruitful than we’d anticipated? 

And that’s when He reminds us, as He did with the disciples, that He is so much bigger than anything we encounter or do today.  

As He did with the disciples. Scripture says, “​​2 There he was transfigured before them. His face shone like the sun, and his clothes became as white as the light. 3 Just then there appeared before them Moses and Elijah, talking with Jesus.” (Matthew 17:2-3, NIV). 

Through that awe-inspiring display, I wonder if He was intentionally strengthening Peter’s, James’s, and John’s faith (Matthew 17:1-13). Was that why He allowed them to see His glory in a way no other human, not even Moses, had? Why He confirmed, with such vivid and irrefutable clarity, that He was the one the prophets (Elijah) spoke about, the fulfillment of the law (Moses)? 

As David Guzik, from the Enduring Word, wrote, “A sight of Christ’s glory while we are here in this world, is a good preparative for our sufferings with Him, as these are preparatives for the sight of His glory in the other world.” 

Through His transfiguration, Jesus made it clear, before His disciples saw Him hanging on the cross, mocked by those in power, that He was God’s Son, the Messiah. 

He gave them powerful, unforgettable, supernatural proof.

Like I said earlier, I believe He lovingly prepares and assures us as well. He answers our questions, strengthens our hearts, and ignites our passions so that we can more boldly follow Him. Our callings? They won’t always be easy. Life this side of heaven rarely is. But we can hold tight to the same promise Christ gave His disciples, when He shined so brightly before them: His glory extends far beyond this severely broken world, and one day, we will be fully surrounded by His light.

Woman gazing over horizon with quote from John Ortberg.

In the meantime, like the disciples, we climb up on that mountain, that place where we can get alone with Him. Where we can sit in His presence and reflect on how vast and beyond comprehension our Savior is. And we realize, no matter what comes or what we might face, He is and always will be enough. Big enough, strong enough, present enough, and faithful enough to carry us through. 

Let’s talk about this! When was the last time you pulled away to sit in God’s presence to catch a glimpse of who He fully is? How might taking time to do so help strengthen you for whatever He’s calling you to do?

Share your thoughts with us in the comments below, because we can all learn from and encourage one another. 

And for those following our chronological New Testament Bible reading plan …

Connect with me on Facebook and Instagram.

You can catch the next episode of the Faith Over Fear podcast here:

Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64 Faith Over Fear

When we encounter painful and frightening circumstances, or God calls us to do something difficult, we may feel as if we’re all alone. As if God doesn’t see us, doesn’t understand our struggle, or won’t provide what we need. But as our guest Ava Pennington reminds us, our God doesn’t change. The same God called Jehovah-Jireh in Scripture, the God who provides, can be trusted to provide for us in our times of need as well. Find Ava Pennington at: https://www.AvaPennington.com https://www.facebook.com/AvaPennington.AuthorPage https://www.instagram.com/avapennington3/ Follow Jennifer: https://jenniferslatterylivesoutloud.com https://www.facebook.com/JenSlatte https://www.instagram.com/slatteryjennifer/ Find Wholly Loved, at: https://www.WhollyLoved.com Join the private Faith Over Fear Group Here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/442736966614671 Resources: Daily Reflections in the Names of God by Ava Pennington Group Discussion Questions: 1. When have you felt alone or unseen by God? 2. What contributed to those feelings? 3. What truths from today’s episode can help counter those feelings? 4. When you consider Christ’s death, for you, what comes to mind? 5. In what ways does the love Christ showed on the cross encourage you in your daily struggles? 6. What does it mean to you that God sees your need and provides in advance? 7. What do you think made it most challenging for Abraham to obey God when He told him to sacrifice his son? 8. What do you think gave Abraham the courage to obey? 9. When has God called you to do something hard or frightening? 10. What did you learn about Him during that situation or event? Episode Image Credit: Getty/rudall30
  1. Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64
  2. Finding Peace in the God of Heaven’s Armies (Jehovah-Sabaoth) – Ep. 63
  3. Trusting Adonai (Our Savior) to Be Our Lord – Ep. 62
  4. Confident of Salvation (el Shaddai) – Ep. 61
  5. Relying on the Great I Am (Yahweh) – Ep. 60

Sometimes, when I encounter others just beginning their faith journey, I forget how tumultuous, difficult, and confusing my first stumbling steps were. I forget how tightly I held to the familiar, even if that meant staying stuck in dysfunction or pain.  And in my mess, my insecurities, and my fears, the patience of my Savior as He daily stooped to my level, took my clammy hand in His, and led me step by step, truth by truth, to spacious fields of joy and peace (Ps. 23).

Not long ago, after I’d shared some of my story with a podcast guest, he proclaimed, “How courageous you were to follow Jesus on that journey of healing.”

Only I wasn’t brave at all, nor did I have any idea where God was leading me half the time. In fact, if it had been up to me, I’m fairly certain I wouldn’t have moved forward at all. But in those moments when my feet became paralyzed with fear, Jesus descended to my level, took my hand in His and gently, lovingly, yet persistently led me to increased freedom.

That’s why He came. To proclaim good news for the poor, freedom for prisoners and the oppressed, and recovery of sight to the blind. His heart has always been tender toward the broken, confused, and deceived. We catch such a beautiful analogy of this, almost like a real-life parable, in Mark 8.

Jesus and His disciples had crossed the sea of Galilee and into Bethsaida, an area He’d previously denounced for its widespread lack of faith or spiritual vision. Verses 22-26 tell us, “…some people brought a blind man and begged Jesus to touch him. He took the blind man by the hand and led him outside the village.”

Then, He spit on the man’s eyes and asked him if he could see.

Although his vision had improved, it remained blurry. “He looked up and said, “I see people; they look like trees walking around.” And so, Jesus touched the man’s eyes again, and this time his sight was restored.

Pause to envision this interaction, as Christ took the man’s hand and led him out of the village. Can you sense Jesus’ gentleness and tender care? I picture Him walking slowly, careful not to cause the man to trip. Taking the man to a more private location, He healed him partially, allowing those first rays of light to stream in, before shattering the darkness for good.

I wonder, what happened in that man’s heart and mind, during that process? Did threads of doubt and fear begin to melt away? Did whispers of lies rise to the surface then get swept away for good? Did the Savior’s first touch, then the second, then the third help him to heal, then teach him to trust, and then to rest?

The passage doesn’t tell us why the One whose words cast out demons and brought life to a girl, once dead, chose to heal this man in such a gradual and deeply personal way. But we know Christ’s shepherd’s heart for His sheep, for those who’ve been walking for some time and maybe have recovered most of their sight. And for those who’ve just begun and are taking their very first timid and stumbling steps. He’s bringing us all to places of unhindered freedom, nudging us ever so gently yet persistently forward.

May we remember this image the next time we’re tempted to grow frustrated with someone else’s slow progress. May we resist the temptation to shove our broken brothers and sisters forward. May we instead slow our step to patiently walk beside them, knowing God will ensure we both reach our destinations.    

Let’s talk about this! Pause to consider all the ways God stooped down to grab hold of you. Remember some of your greatest struggles, or maybe even your current battles. How does your memory of those moments impact your view of other people’s behaviors?

For those following our Chronological Bible reading plan through the New Testament …

Connect with Jennifer on Facebook and Instagram.

Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64 Faith Over Fear

When we encounter painful and frightening circumstances, or God calls us to do something difficult, we may feel as if we’re all alone. As if God doesn’t see us, doesn’t understand our struggle, or won’t provide what we need. But as our guest Ava Pennington reminds us, our God doesn’t change. The same God called Jehovah-Jireh in Scripture, the God who provides, can be trusted to provide for us in our times of need as well. Find Ava Pennington at: https://www.AvaPennington.com https://www.facebook.com/AvaPennington.AuthorPage https://www.instagram.com/avapennington3/ Follow Jennifer: https://jenniferslatterylivesoutloud.com https://www.facebook.com/JenSlatte https://www.instagram.com/slatteryjennifer/ Find Wholly Loved, at: https://www.WhollyLoved.com Join the private Faith Over Fear Group Here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/442736966614671 Resources: Daily Reflections in the Names of God by Ava Pennington Group Discussion Questions: 1. When have you felt alone or unseen by God? 2. What contributed to those feelings? 3. What truths from today’s episode can help counter those feelings? 4. When you consider Christ’s death, for you, what comes to mind? 5. In what ways does the love Christ showed on the cross encourage you in your daily struggles? 6. What does it mean to you that God sees your need and provides in advance? 7. What do you think made it most challenging for Abraham to obey God when He told him to sacrifice his son? 8. What do you think gave Abraham the courage to obey? 9. When has God called you to do something hard or frightening? 10. What did you learn about Him during that situation or event? Episode Image Credit: Getty/rudall30
  1. Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64
  2. Finding Peace in the God of Heaven’s Armies (Jehovah-Sabaoth) – Ep. 63
  3. Trusting Adonai (Our Savior) to Be Our Lord – Ep. 62
  4. Confident of Salvation (el Shaddai) – Ep. 61
  5. Relying on the Great I Am (Yahweh) – Ep. 60

Quote on prayer from Max Lucado on a picture with a candle.

What do we do when our loved one has barricaded themselves from God? When, despite our desperate prayers and all the times and ways we’ve tried to reach out, they slip further from Him and into greater deception, greater sin, and greater emotional and spiritual slavery? In those situations, when decades pass with no hint of progress, it’s easy to give up. To conclude the person is simply too hard-hearted.

Have you been there? I have. With that friend who’s so quick to downplay and discount the miraculous. With the relative who, during times of crisis, seemed so open to spiritual conversations, only to numb themselves with Netflix and social media once their difficulties pass. That individual that had been so clearly touched by God, was being drawn by Him, then turned the other way.

When that happens, our fervent and steadfast prayers can turn rote. Then silent.

At least, that tends to be my progression. But then God reminds me, no matter how dark the human heart or how bleak things appear, His arm is never too short, His hearing and His heart never too dull, to save.

May we all exhibit the courage of the Canaanite woman who pushed her way into a house filled with religious students, and Jewish ones at that, for the sake of her child. You can read her full story in Matthew 15. To paraphrase, Scripture tells us Jesus and His disciples traveled 30-40 miles into Gentile country where they found a place to stay.

I imagine this made the disciples quite uncomfortable—to be in Gentile territory, in a Gentile home, most likely eating off of Gentile dishes. According to 19th century theologian Charles Ellicott, “The strict Jew would not enter a Gentile’s house, nor sit on the same couch, nor eat or drink out of the same vessel.” To them, “the very dust of a heathen city was defiling.”

But there was Jesus, intentionally taking His disciples into Tyre, a port city known for its idolatry, corrupt merchants, and sexual immorality. This would’ve been the equivalent to the mega-church pastor and his staff sleeping at the local crack house.

The disciples must have felt on edge from the moment they crossed over ancient Israel’s borders. But before they’d even had a chance to settle in, a Gentile woman barged into the house.

A woman with a demon possessed daughter.

To the Jewish mind, I’m not sure this situation could’ve been any more “unclean.”

The more devout would’ve seen this intruding woman as a threat. Rather than a desperate mother pleading for the life of her child, the girl she’d once nursed and swaddled and sang to sleep. The daughter she’d watched take her first steps and speak her first words, ravished and enslaved.

How did the disciples respond to this woman’s anguished pleas? In essence, “She’s a nuisance. Get her out of here.”

And I have to wonder, who’s my Canaanite? That person I’m tempted to categorize by their sin rather than their humanity? The one I’ve deemed hopeless, beyond God’s love and grace? The person who, if I’m honest, disgusts me?

And who is fervently praying for that person I’m so quick to cast aside, as I am for my loved one and this anguished mother was for her child: “Have mercy on me, O Lord, Son of David!”

In this simple yet profound address, the woman displayed more faith than the “righteous” Pharisees who’d gotten all worked up over some dirty dishes in the passage prior. More faith, perhaps, than the disciples acting so contemptuous before her. She knew Jesus was her daughter’s only hope and so she boldly came. She refused to leave until she received what she came for—her daughter made whole.

That was precisely what Christ provided.

Jesus said to her, “‘Woman, you have great faith! Your request is granted.’ And her daughter was healed at that moment” (Matthew 15:28, NIV).

Here’s what I find most inspiring. The woman’s daughter wasn’t going to come to Jesus on her own. In fact, had she encountered Him, I imagine she would’ve cussed Him out or mocked Him. She was about as far from Christ as a person could get. A hopeless case, from a human perspective.

But her mom wasn’t dissuaded by human logic, the disciple’s scorn, nor Jesus’s delayed response. Her love for her daughter was simply too strong.

I want that same kind of determined, persevering faith, whether I must pray for a day, a week, or years.   

We all have “Canaanites” in our circle, maybe even in our families. Those people we fear might be too far from God. Those loved ones we’ve prayed for for decades, only to see them slip further from Christ. But even now, God’s arm is not too short to save.

Our prayers matter.

Who have you been desperately praying for? How does this woman from Tyre encourage you to persist? Share your thoughts, and your prayer requests, with us in the comments below, and let’s encourage and pray for and with one another!

For those following our chronological reading through the New Testament, can you believe we’re on week 26?! Here’s this week’s reading, beginning with the account of this faith-filled Canaanite woman:

Week 26 New Testament Chronological Reading Plan Daily Readings

And, fun news! Wholly Loved Unshakable Unbreakable Joy Bible study is now available for FREE! Grab your copy HERE.

Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64 Faith Over Fear

When we encounter painful and frightening circumstances, or God calls us to do something difficult, we may feel as if we’re all alone. As if God doesn’t see us, doesn’t understand our struggle, or won’t provide what we need. But as our guest Ava Pennington reminds us, our God doesn’t change. The same God called Jehovah-Jireh in Scripture, the God who provides, can be trusted to provide for us in our times of need as well. Find Ava Pennington at: https://www.AvaPennington.com https://www.facebook.com/AvaPennington.AuthorPage https://www.instagram.com/avapennington3/ Follow Jennifer: https://jenniferslatterylivesoutloud.com https://www.facebook.com/JenSlatte https://www.instagram.com/slatteryjennifer/ Find Wholly Loved, at: https://www.WhollyLoved.com Join the private Faith Over Fear Group Here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/442736966614671 Resources: Daily Reflections in the Names of God by Ava Pennington Group Discussion Questions: 1. When have you felt alone or unseen by God? 2. What contributed to those feelings? 3. What truths from today’s episode can help counter those feelings? 4. When you consider Christ’s death, for you, what comes to mind? 5. In what ways does the love Christ showed on the cross encourage you in your daily struggles? 6. What does it mean to you that God sees your need and provides in advance? 7. What do you think made it most challenging for Abraham to obey God when He told him to sacrifice his son? 8. What do you think gave Abraham the courage to obey? 9. When has God called you to do something hard or frightening? 10. What did you learn about Him during that situation or event? Episode Image Credit: Getty/rudall30
  1. Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64
  2. Finding Peace in the God of Heaven’s Armies (Jehovah-Sabaoth) – Ep. 63
  3. Trusting Adonai (Our Savior) to Be Our Lord – Ep. 62
  4. Confident of Salvation (el Shaddai) – Ep. 61
  5. Relying on the Great I Am (Yahweh) – Ep. 60

Guest Post by the Heroes 2 Team

Quote on Christ feeding a hungry soul on an image of a woman gazing upward.

In a world of rush, will we still be able to find what really matters? 

I grew up in a family with high regard for education. My parents told me this was  our key to success and the only inheritance they could give us. But there were no books in our home, the kind my classmates used to bring at school–tales and fiction! We only had Bibles and handed-down devotionals from my uncle who was a pastor.

As a young person, I learned the verse, “Seek ye first the kingdom of God and all these things shall be added unto you” (Matt. 6:33, KJV). I felt it was beautiful! I loved the “all these things shall be added unto you” part and realized I found the formula to success!

Or so I thought.

I studied hard, prayed hard, and asked God for blessings in all that I did. I thought I was invincible! Well, how could I fail right? The Lord was my ally! However, my heart wasn’t in the right place. I was seeking personal honor and success, not to  glorify God or advance His kingdom.

We all have a tendency to seek for something we don’t have. Don’t we? Wealth, position, or influence. We think if we achieve that award, get a salary increase, or increase our following on social media, maybe then we can be truly happy. 

But when we’re lost or caught in the middle of a crossroad, we often find ourselves looking for a sign, a miracle, or divine intervention. When things aren’t going our way, we want answers. We check out all other routes except for the Lord.

Sadly, many souls today are spiritually malnourished. While we’re often in a  rush to feed the body and can fail to feed our souls.

The Earthly Manna 

Scripture tells us of a time when Jesus miraculously provided for a large, hungry group of men, women, and children. The next day, they went looking for Jesus. After Jesus fed the five thousand, men came looking after Him.


The Savior knew their hearts. They were looking for Him to satisfy their physical needs. But Jesus was offering a superior Bread. The Bread of eternal life.

He told them, “Very truly I tell you, you are looking for Me, not because you saw the signs I performed but because you ate the loaves and had your fill. Do not work for food that spoils, but for food that endures to eternal life, which the Son of Man will give you. For on Him God the Father has placed His seal of approval” (John 6:26, 27, ESV).

Jesus offers us the same invitation. 

The Bread of Life

In a world of hustle and bustle, it can be difficult to hush for a while, to pause, to ponder, and to realign ourselves with our  real purpose. It’s easy to get lost and disoriented amidst life’s pressures; we tend to focus too much on the physical, temporal, and visible.

Although there is nothing wrong with attending to one’s needs, But no one but Jesus can satisfy the hunger of our souls. As He said in Matthew 4:4, In Matthew 4:4, Jesus said, “Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God” (ESV).

In giving His body for the world, God made a way for us to be saved from eternal death. Christ promised, in John 11:26 that, “everyone who lives and believes in [Him] shall never die” (ESV).

Jesus cares for our physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being, and we can trust Him to provide. 

to worry about many things and to cling to false securities. This hinders our trust in and dependence on Christ. 

God is not indifferent to the wants of His children. He who calls us by name and  numbers the hairs on our head knows our needs and longings of our heart.

He reminds His children, Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them” (Matthew 7:8, ESV).

Today may we remind ourselves that the God who multiplied the loaves and fishes  is the same God who will provide us too.

In Him we will receive what we truly need.

More about Heroes 2

Heroes 2 is a Bible trivia game released by the Hope Channel. It is a sequel to the game, Heroes, which was released way back in 2013. The latest game version is in its new 3D animation, comes with unique features, and has more challenging Bible questions in four languages: English, Portuguese, Spanish, and French. The game is available on both iOS and Android.

Find them HERE, and make sure to tell others about this app!

For those following our Chronological New Testament reading plan …

Bible plan image

Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64 Faith Over Fear

When we encounter painful and frightening circumstances, or God calls us to do something difficult, we may feel as if we’re all alone. As if God doesn’t see us, doesn’t understand our struggle, or won’t provide what we need. But as our guest Ava Pennington reminds us, our God doesn’t change. The same God called Jehovah-Jireh in Scripture, the God who provides, can be trusted to provide for us in our times of need as well. Find Ava Pennington at: https://www.AvaPennington.com https://www.facebook.com/AvaPennington.AuthorPage https://www.instagram.com/avapennington3/ Follow Jennifer: https://jenniferslatterylivesoutloud.com https://www.facebook.com/JenSlatte https://www.instagram.com/slatteryjennifer/ Find Wholly Loved, at: https://www.WhollyLoved.com Join the private Faith Over Fear Group Here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/442736966614671 Resources: Daily Reflections in the Names of God by Ava Pennington Group Discussion Questions: 1. When have you felt alone or unseen by God? 2. What contributed to those feelings? 3. What truths from today’s episode can help counter those feelings? 4. When you consider Christ’s death, for you, what comes to mind? 5. In what ways does the love Christ showed on the cross encourage you in your daily struggles? 6. What does it mean to you that God sees your need and provides in advance? 7. What do you think made it most challenging for Abraham to obey God when He told him to sacrifice his son? 8. What do you think gave Abraham the courage to obey? 9. When has God called you to do something hard or frightening? 10. What did you learn about Him during that situation or event? Episode Image Credit: Getty/rudall30
  1. Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64
  2. Finding Peace in the God of Heaven’s Armies (Jehovah-Sabaoth) – Ep. 63
  3. Trusting Adonai (Our Savior) to Be Our Lord – Ep. 62
  4. Confident of Salvation (el Shaddai) – Ep. 61
  5. Relying on the Great I Am (Yahweh) – Ep. 60

Quote from J. Oswald with an image of a woman sitting on a tractor bar.

The person who lives completely yielded to Christ will often find themselves taking on tasks that feel utterly beyond them. Or perhaps to put it another way, we can’t live Spirit-empowered in our comfort zones. God continually calls us to step outside of those nice, safe walls we’ve positioned around ourselves, and into the area of insufficiency and need. Where we know, without a miracle, we’ll fail. Lives will go untouched, hearts unhealed, tummies unfed. 

As a high school dropout, former homeless girl, turned ministry leader, I often find myself in that place. Holding conversations with those much more experienced and spiritually mature than I am. Accepting eternally important assignments that I know I’m ill-equipped for. When those opportunities come, while I do take time to evaluate my skills and schedules, I never want my calendar to drive my yeses and nos. 

That might sound counter-intuitive, even irresponsible. But it comes down to this: I want to be Spirit, not logic, led. I long to imitate the apostle Paul, who, during his missionary journeys, listened for God’s guidance and responded immediately, even if that meant abruptly changing directions. 

I’m not there yet. I have moments of complete, faith-filled surrender and others where I remain stuck, in fear-based indecision for far too long. Where I’m focused more on details, on all I don’t have, rather than my abundant, limitless God. As if the results of my obedience were up to me. 

They’re not, nor does God want me to live this Christian life according to my capabilities and strength. That won’t bring Him glory, nor will it strengthen my faith. But when I respond to His promptings with faith, despite my inner wrestling and doubts, lives are changed, mine included. That’s when I encounter the God of impossible, and having experienced His miracle-working power first hand, my faith will never be the same. I will never un-see or un-hear, and no twist of logic could ever negate, all my God has done. 

Perhaps that’s the biggest miracle of all—the work He does in us as He uses seemingly impossible situations to illuminate then annihilate our doubt within. Those situations that simply seem far too difficult for even God to address.

Like feeding 5,000 hungry men from five barley loaves and two fish. Scripture tells us Jesus, noticing His disciples themselves had empty bellies (Mark 6:31), led them to a deserted place on the far side of the Sea of Galilee (John6:1). Soon, a huge crowd followed, and He began healing their sick and teaching them about the kingdom of God. By late afternoon, the disciples encouraged Jesus to send the people away so that they could find food and lodging in the nearby villages (Luke 9:12).   

“Turning to Philip, [Jesus] asked, ‘Where can we buy bread to feel all these people?’” 

Philip’s jaw must’ve gone slack. Buy food for 5,000 men and all their women and children? Impossible! He replied, “Even if we worked for months, we wouldn’t have enough money to feed them!” (John 6:7, NLT). 

But notice what Scripture says in the verse prior. “[Jesus] was testing Philip, for He already knew what He was going to do” (John 6:6, NLT). He didn’t ask because He was baffled or concerned. He knew the solution, and the outcome, before He made the disciples aware of the problem. He was simply using the situation to “test” Philip—to reveal areas of doubt so that Jesus could move him to deeper faith. 

And so, after organizing everyone into groups of 50-100, Jesus thanked God for their meager supplies and distributed the food to the people, until everyone had eaten their fill. In discussing this passage, David Guzik from the Enduring Word reminds us that this included the little boy who forfeited his lunch as well. “The boy himself ended up with more than he started with,” Guzik wrote. “It certainly was an adequate lunch for himself; but he gave it to Jesus and He turned it into an all-you-can-eat buffet for the boy as well.”

I’m certain the child’s faith grew exponentially that day also, as he watched the disciples continue to person after person in group after group, passing out the bread. As he ate all his young belly could hold. And especially as he watched, probably wide-eyed, while the disciples gathered the leftovers—12 baskets full! And based on the original Greek, these were far from small containers. 

In this, God left no room for doubt. He was the God of abundance who can, and often does, multiply our meager offerings into supernatural displays of His power and love. But as encouraging as that might be, I’d like to end with this:

While I don’t envision the disciples telling Jesus no—even if they’d wanted to, the young child certainly could have. Consider, what if he hadn’t offered up his meal? What if, staring about at all these grown men, insecurity and shyness had held him back. Wouldn’t they think him a fanciful child? He only had five loaves and two fish, after all. What if he spoke up and the people mocked or chastised him? Or, what if they ate his food and he ended up hungry?

He could’ve kept his lunch to himself.

Then, I’m certain God would have provided for the crowd some other way, but the kid would’ve missed out. 

I’d much rather risk looking like a fanciful fool than to miss out on the amazing things of God. Hopefully I’ll remember this the next time I sense God nudging me into an unknown, uncomfortable, and seemingly impossible situation. 

Let’s talk about this! In what area of your life is God calling you to respond with big faith, even in the midst of your discomfort? What truths from today’s passage can help you find the courage to do so? And perhaps the most important question: Will you?  

Share your thoughts with us in the comments below and make sure to connect with Jennifer on Facebook and Instagram.

For those following our Chronological Bible reading plan through the New Testament, today’s post kicked us off with the first day’s reading.

Make sure to check out the latest Faith Over Fear Podcast episode on living courageously as expressions of our Creator:

Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64 Faith Over Fear

When we encounter painful and frightening circumstances, or God calls us to do something difficult, we may feel as if we’re all alone. As if God doesn’t see us, doesn’t understand our struggle, or won’t provide what we need. But as our guest Ava Pennington reminds us, our God doesn’t change. The same God called Jehovah-Jireh in Scripture, the God who provides, can be trusted to provide for us in our times of need as well. Find Ava Pennington at: https://www.AvaPennington.com https://www.facebook.com/AvaPennington.AuthorPage https://www.instagram.com/avapennington3/ Follow Jennifer: https://jenniferslatterylivesoutloud.com https://www.facebook.com/JenSlatte https://www.instagram.com/slatteryjennifer/ Find Wholly Loved, at: https://www.WhollyLoved.com Join the private Faith Over Fear Group Here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/442736966614671 Resources: Daily Reflections in the Names of God by Ava Pennington Group Discussion Questions: 1. When have you felt alone or unseen by God? 2. What contributed to those feelings? 3. What truths from today’s episode can help counter those feelings? 4. When you consider Christ’s death, for you, what comes to mind? 5. In what ways does the love Christ showed on the cross encourage you in your daily struggles? 6. What does it mean to you that God sees your need and provides in advance? 7. What do you think made it most challenging for Abraham to obey God when He told him to sacrifice his son? 8. What do you think gave Abraham the courage to obey? 9. When has God called you to do something hard or frightening? 10. What did you learn about Him during that situation or event? Episode Image Credit: Getty/rudall30
  1. Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64
  2. Finding Peace in the God of Heaven’s Armies (Jehovah-Sabaoth) – Ep. 63
  3. Trusting Adonai (Our Savior) to Be Our Lord – Ep. 62
  4. Confident of Salvation (el Shaddai) – Ep. 61
  5. Relying on the Great I Am (Yahweh) – Ep. 60

As a writer and speaker, I’m constantly battling my people-pleasing tendencies and its underlying fear of rejection. One would think this would get easier with the more content I share, and in some ways it does. But in other ways, this inner struggle between self-protection and unhindered obedience seems to have gained momentum. Perhaps because I feel more is at stake. I’ve also discovered, with increased reach and exposure, often, comes increased backlash. Granted, the positive feedback I receive by far outweighs the ugly emails, messages, or comments. But as much as I hate to admit this, every attack leaves something of a mark.

Sometimes that mark is small, but a temporary annoyance, almost like that pesky fly that buzzes around your plate at the picnic table. Other times, like when the remark comes from someone I care about, they sink a bit deeper, causing worries and anxieties.

Then there are those moments when I wrestle with uncertainty, not knowing what to speak when. Is that jolt in my spirit from God, personal offense, or pride? Is my reluctance and discomfort an indication that God wants me to remain silent, or simply my anxiety rising within? I certainly don’t want to add to our world’s often mind-numbing noise with yet another humanity-driven post.

In short, in everything I do and say, I want to be Spirit, not Jennifer Slattery, led. That sounds oh-so-spiritual, doesn’t it? But living that desire out? That’s hard. It takes courage, patience, and a deep and continual reliance on Christ.

When I do that, not only will I find increased clarity regarding when and how to use my voice, but I’ll also find the strength and boldness to do so. Even in the face of great danger.

At least, that’s my hope and my goal. I want to be so filled with Christ, so surrendered to Him, He alone holds the key to my tongue. I don’t want to gauge my obedience on how others might respond or react to me.

I want to publicly, vocally, and courageously live for God, even if that means taking on the rich, the influential, and the powerful, like John the Baptist did, prior to his death. Scripture indicates, at some point, his words captured the attention of Herod the tetrarch who ruled Galilee in the early first century. Mark 6:18-20 tells us that “John had been saying to Herod, ‘It is not lawful for you to have your brother’s wife.’ 19 So Herodias nursed a grudge against John and wanted to kill him. But she was not able to, 20 because Herod feared John and protected him, knowing him to be a righteous and holy man. When Herod heard John, he was greatly puzzled; yet he liked to listen to him.

Notice, John’s words weren’t light or affirming. He spoke some hard truths. And though he came “in the spirit and power of Elijah” and indeed turned many hearts toward Jesus (Luke 1:17), not everyone responded positively to his message. Some, like Herod, were intrigued, others were changed, and still others, like Herodias, lashed out against him.

When we share truth, we should expect similar results.

But God calls us to share His good news with all people—the angry and the kind, the curious and apathetic—relying on Him and leaving the result to Him.

I’m not there yet. I have moments where I speak with courage and other times when I remain quiet out of insecurity or fear. This is an area I need to grow in. I want to be alert to how God might want to use me and remain ready to respond. I want His voice, not my insecurities or other people’s responses, to drive my actions.

What about you? What stood out to you most in John’s behavior? Or, if you read the full account (found HERE and HERE), what stood out to you most in the passage? How might God be speaking to you through it?    

For those following along with our chronological Bible reading plan through the New Testament, today’s post kicked us off on day one.

Make sure to connect with Jennifer on Facebook and Instagram.

And catch the latest Faith Over Fear podcast episode here:

Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64 Faith Over Fear

When we encounter painful and frightening circumstances, or God calls us to do something difficult, we may feel as if we’re all alone. As if God doesn’t see us, doesn’t understand our struggle, or won’t provide what we need. But as our guest Ava Pennington reminds us, our God doesn’t change. The same God called Jehovah-Jireh in Scripture, the God who provides, can be trusted to provide for us in our times of need as well. Find Ava Pennington at: https://www.AvaPennington.com https://www.facebook.com/AvaPennington.AuthorPage https://www.instagram.com/avapennington3/ Follow Jennifer: https://jenniferslatterylivesoutloud.com https://www.facebook.com/JenSlatte https://www.instagram.com/slatteryjennifer/ Find Wholly Loved, at: https://www.WhollyLoved.com Join the private Faith Over Fear Group Here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/442736966614671 Resources: Daily Reflections in the Names of God by Ava Pennington Group Discussion Questions: 1. When have you felt alone or unseen by God? 2. What contributed to those feelings? 3. What truths from today’s episode can help counter those feelings? 4. When you consider Christ’s death, for you, what comes to mind? 5. In what ways does the love Christ showed on the cross encourage you in your daily struggles? 6. What does it mean to you that God sees your need and provides in advance? 7. What do you think made it most challenging for Abraham to obey God when He told him to sacrifice his son? 8. What do you think gave Abraham the courage to obey? 9. When has God called you to do something hard or frightening? 10. What did you learn about Him during that situation or event? Episode Image Credit: Getty/rudall30
  1. Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64
  2. Finding Peace in the God of Heaven’s Armies (Jehovah-Sabaoth) – Ep. 63
  3. Trusting Adonai (Our Savior) to Be Our Lord – Ep. 62
  4. Confident of Salvation (el Shaddai) – Ep. 61
  5. Relying on the Great I Am (Yahweh) – Ep. 60

Years ago, in the middle of what felt like a crisis, God challenged me to consider how deep my loyalties lay. Really, to consider who He truly was to me. Would I treat Him as a Genie or a motivational guru who offered plithy words of affirmation when I needed an emotional boost, or would I live as if He truly was my Lord?

This was about thirteen years ago, during what I term my “Louisiana experience” when God’s healing work within me intensified in a way that left me reeling. I felt as if I was reliving some key, devastating moments and was free-falling into some of my greatest fears.

I wanted Him to fix my circumstances–immediately. To save our house, save our finances and really, our way of life.

But Christ wanted to fix my soul, and so, in the middle of my desperate prayers, He asked, “Do you love Me now.”

In other words, “If I don’t answer your prayers as you hope, will you still choose Me?”

He was challenging me to evaluate my expectations, and to toss them if need be.

Some 2,000 years ago, the men and women of Nazareth faced a similar choice. Would they accept that Jesus, the One from whom, perhaps they’d purchased furniture from, was the long-promised Messiah? They must’ve heard about all the miracles He’d performed. How He’d healed people of their diseases, cast out demons, and even raised a dead girl to life. The people were amazed by all He did and said, until He made it clear, He wasn’t just a prophet or well-spoken teacher. He wasn’t just Someone out to better their day. He was God’s anointed Savior, His Son, with the full authority that entailed.

Reading from Isaiah 61:1-3, He said, “The Spirit of the Lord is on Me,
    because He has anointed Me
    to proclaim good news to the poor.
He has sent Me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners
    and recovery of sight for the blind,
to set the oppressed free,
19     to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor” (Luke 4:18-19, NIV).

20  Today this scripture is fulfilled in your hearing” (Luke 4:21b, NIV).

The Jews wanted a Savior, just not the One standing before them. No. They wanted a much more regal, more prestigious, and more political, less … rustic Messiah. And so they scoffed, rejecting the freedom Christ offered because it didn’t come packaged as they’d expected.

And while I’ve accepted God’s free gift of salvation, there’ve been times when I’ve resisted His Spirit. I’ve learned, after stumbling down numerous exhausting dead ends, however, His is the only path that leads to freedom. He truly did come to bring good news to the poor, freedom for the oppressed and the enslaved.

These words, which Jesus read to the people in that Nazarene synagogue some 2,000 years ago, were originally spoken by the prophet Isaiah during a dark time in Israel’s history. After a short period of revival, the people had once again slipped into idolatry. God warned them, again and again, if they didn’t repent, judgment would come. But even then, God wouldn’t abandon them forever. Life wouldn’t always be hard and painful; eventually, jubilee, a day of joy and freedom, would come.

God makes that same promise to us. Whether we’re suffering the consequences of our sin or perhaps sin that’s been done to us, we can trust good will come. His heart is for us always. When we remember that He truly did come to set the captive free, we’ll find it easier to surrender to His lead, even when His plans or methods don’t match our temporary expectations.   

For those following the Chronological New Testament Reading plan, please note, the NIV Chronological Bible placed today’s passage (Luke 4:16-32) in a different chronological order.

This week’s reading plan:

Text on a salmon-colored graphic.

We experience freedom when our desire to get well overrides our desire to self-protect.

This might mean admitting our marriage isn’t quite as cheery as it seems, or that we can’t fight that addiction or mental health challenge or whatever battle we’re facing alone. That we need God’s help, and just maybe, the help of others as well.

Often that first step out of the shadows, out of hiding, is the hardest.

It was for me. Some of you know my story. It’s far from glamorous, which is why I hid it for so long. For nearly 20 years, in fact. I thought I was protecting myself from rejection and embarrassment. But my hiding only increased my insecurity and shame. Though I was a deeply loved child of God, I felt like a fraud. Defective.

And so, I hid my inadequacies and pain behind trendy clothes, an immaculate house, and cheery Sunday morning slogans. I tried so hard to mimic everyone else who appeared to have it all together.

Maybe you have too.

I’ve since realized, those who present such polished, perfect personas are just as broken as everyone else. They’ve got their hurts and regrets and parts of themselves they try to hide.

But Jesus calls us to step into the light, progressively and steadily, until He illuminates, heals, and transforms every crevice of our souls. Trust in this long-proven truth: God will create such beauty in us, if we’ll let Him draw us out of the shadows and into the light of His love and grace.

quote from post with white, salmon, and navy design.

One day, after sharing some of my story with a friend, she said she admired my willingness to be uncomfortable when God asked. I had to consider her statement for a moment, because honestly, I’m not nearly as noble as her words might suggest. I’m not even all that courageous. I’ve just learned to fear those things that are truly fearful. I’ve discovered, most often, life apart from God’s leading is so much more painful, hopeless and bleak than anything He might call me to.

Through all my years of walking with God, He’s demonstrated something again and again. I can trust Him with each step, knowing He’ll always guide me toward increased wholeness, increased freedom, and increased intimacy with Him, the only One in whom true and lasting joy can be found.

I don’t know what your path to healing will look like. (Or, perhaps has looked like.) Only God does. But I’m relatively certain it’ll involve some level of risk. Having the courage to say, “I’m not okay. This isn’t okay. God, I need Your help, and I am willing to follow, however You lead.”

Seeking His aid? That’s the easy part. Trusting Him enough to heed his guidance? To press through, and keep pressing, until the victory’s won?

That’s tough.

In Mark 5, we learn about an unnamed individual known initially as “the woman with the issue of blood.” That appeared to be her defining feature, one we know, from Old Testament law, would’ve guaranteed a life of isolation and shame. Others, the religious elite who appeared to have it all together especially, considered her dirty. They wanted nothing to do with her. Wouldn’t even touch her, lest some of her uncleanness should rub off on them.

Have you ever had anyone treat you that way? As if your very presence caused their nose to wrinkle? Those who avoided you in conversations or maybe even crossed to the other side of the room? Those interactions can leave such deep wounds in our hearts, wounds that don’t often heal quickly.

Imagine enduring 12 years of that, and not just from the “cool” people in church, or in this case, the Temple, but from everyone. The entire Jewish community. Her depth of loneliness would’ve been crushing. Her feelings of worthlessness and shame, all consuming. She was so desperate for aid, for love and connection, she sought doctor after doctor, tried one supposed cure after another, until her she’d spent her last dollar.

I wonder if, when she learned Jesus was coming to town, if she considered staying home. She’d had her hopes dashed so many times, why allow herself to hope yet again? But something within her, a desperation for life—real life—rose up and gave her the courage to push through the crowd.

Probably fearing someone would recognize her and call her out as unclean. Oh, the mortification! But still she came, pressing closer and closer, thinking, “If I just touch His clothes, I will be healed” (Mark 5:28, NIV).

And she was! Scripture says, “Immediately her bleeding stopped and she felt in her body that she was freed from her suffering” (Mark 5:29, NIV). Miracle experienced, she might’ve planned on slipping quietly away, but Jesus called her out. “Who touched My clothes” He asked, not because He didn’t know. Other passages demonstrate that He was capable of reading hearts and minds. No, He called this woman out because His beautiful, transformative work in her wasn’t through.

But notice, she had to take that first step. She had to choose whether to slip back into the crowd and dart away, unnoticed by all but God, or step out into His grace. She chose the latter and fell before Him, trembling.

And Jesus responded, “Daughter, your faith has healed you. Go in peace” –in wholeness— “and be freed from your suffering” (V. 34, NIV)

Daughter. Can you sense the tenderness in that word? She went from being “the woman who suffered from the issue of blood,” to hearing Christ call her daughter—the only woman in Scripture Christ referred to as such. And in this, He proclaimed to her and to all those watching, that they were not to consider her unclean.

No. She was His beloved, seen and known, and made whole, daughter.

I’m convinced the healing His words created, deep in her soul, brought her the greatest freedom of all.    

Let’s talk about this! Where are you at in your healing journey? What’s your next courageous step?

Fort those following our chronological Bible reading plan through the New Testament, today’s post kicks us off with Mark 5:21-34.

Chronological Bible reading plan week 21 graphic.
I also encourage you to check out the latest Faith Over Fear Podcast Episode:

Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64 Faith Over Fear

When we encounter painful and frightening circumstances, or God calls us to do something difficult, we may feel as if we’re all alone. As if God doesn’t see us, doesn’t understand our struggle, or won’t provide what we need. But as our guest Ava Pennington reminds us, our God doesn’t change. The same God called Jehovah-Jireh in Scripture, the God who provides, can be trusted to provide for us in our times of need as well. Find Ava Pennington at: https://www.AvaPennington.com https://www.facebook.com/AvaPennington.AuthorPage https://www.instagram.com/avapennington3/ Follow Jennifer: https://jenniferslatterylivesoutloud.com https://www.facebook.com/JenSlatte https://www.instagram.com/slatteryjennifer/ Find Wholly Loved, at: https://www.WhollyLoved.com Join the private Faith Over Fear Group Here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/442736966614671 Resources: Daily Reflections in the Names of God by Ava Pennington Group Discussion Questions: 1. When have you felt alone or unseen by God? 2. What contributed to those feelings? 3. What truths from today’s episode can help counter those feelings? 4. When you consider Christ’s death, for you, what comes to mind? 5. In what ways does the love Christ showed on the cross encourage you in your daily struggles? 6. What does it mean to you that God sees your need and provides in advance? 7. What do you think made it most challenging for Abraham to obey God when He told him to sacrifice his son? 8. What do you think gave Abraham the courage to obey? 9. When has God called you to do something hard or frightening? 10. What did you learn about Him during that situation or event? Episode Image Credit: Getty/rudall30
  1. Resting in the God Who Provides (Jehovah-Jireh) – Ep. 64
  2. Finding Peace in the God of Heaven’s Armies (Jehovah-Sabaoth) – Ep. 63
  3. Trusting Adonai (Our Savior) to Be Our Lord – Ep. 62
  4. Confident of Salvation (el Shaddai) – Ep. 61
  5. Relying on the Great I Am (Yahweh) – Ep. 60